Raper’s Abortion

by Ryan on March 7, 2007

in Culture

Jennifer Raper has a two year old daughter that she didn’t want. In fact she tried to end her daughter’s life through an abortion, but after a failed procedure in April 2004 and a misdiagnosis of her 20-week pregnancy in July, she remained pregnant and gave birth that December. She’s now suing Planned Parenthood and the doctors involved so that they may fork over the costs of raising her child. Oh boy (or girl)…

Now I’m perfectly fine with smacking-up Planned Parenthood and financially harming doctors who euthanize babies by performing abortions, but something doesn’t feel right. She wanted to end her daughter’s life in-utero, yet gave birth nobly, and now wants someone else to pay for her motherhood! What about adoption, family, or a job– a decision everyone else has to make without the benefit of suing or the perfect conditions during and after a pregnancy? I just think something doesn’t feel right about this.

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

Scott Hughes March 7, 2007 at 7:12 pm

It seems to make sense to me. It seems like clear-cut malpractice. Thus, the malpracticer has to pay for the consequences of the malpractice, which happen to be an expensive child.

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Nurse Duncan March 7, 2007 at 9:35 pm

The timeline doesn’t make clear-cut sense. Assuming Jennifer Raper took the pregnancy the normal 36 weeks which places conception in March 2004 if she gave birth in December 2004, roughly. Assuming she has normal menstrual periods every 28 days, the earliest detection of pregnancy, assuming no malignancies or ectopic, is one week after conception by a blood test which needs to be repeated to confirm normal rising levels of hCG. So say she conceives March 1st 2004. She then gets a blood test March 8th with results the next day usually. So then say April 30th, she’s about 8 weeks pregnant, and goes in for the abortion. Usually the method of abortion for pregnancies 8 weeks or less is Methotrexate (which can be counteracted by folic acid in a multivitamin), RU 486, or other pills that are only 65 to 95 percent effective. The second doctor didn’t pick up that she was 20 weeks pregnant, or wasn’t told that she missed 5 menstrual periods, again assuming the 28 day cycle. If she is overweight or obese, women may not show at 20 weeks. Also the second doctor is affiliated with Boston Medical Center not Planned Parenthood yet the article neglects to state what kind of doctor he is. Many things need to be specified from that article because there are too many loose ends to prove malpractice from a biological point of view based on the timeline of events. Furthermore, malpractice only applies to any untoward effects with the child (disability, psychiatric, etc.) and her 2 year old is healthy. Jennifer Raper has an uphill battle and I wish her luck.

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Sal March 8, 2007 at 7:42 am

Scott,

Why isn’t adoption an option? I can understand the costs of delivery and birth (although I find the entire episode abhorant), but her keeping the child is a conscious choice.

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Noonan March 9, 2007 at 5:31 pm

I’d first like to say that I don’t agree that the article gives enough detail to leave questions about the timeline. A normal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, not 36. The article does not specify that the woman learned of her pregnancy from a blood test instead of home pregnancy test, which would be taken later and does not have results until you skip a period. It is also an unfair assumption to say that the woman had a normal 28 day cycle-a large number of women are very irregular in that department.

The second doctor should have picked up on the pregnancy at 20 weeks from a simple history and physical. A good doctor would ask a woman when her last period was and if she has ever had an abortion/been on birth control/and if she is sexually active. At 20 weeks, a pregnant woman’s body has undergone a number of changes (like the size of a uterus and various pregnancy symptoms). Nor does a woman have to “show” for a doctor to realize she’s pregnant at 20 weeks – With my first child, I did not start to “show” until well after 20 weeks.

As a registered nurse and a mother, I don’t see a lot of holes in the timeline, although I do see sloppy medicine. If you do an invasive procedure, you need to make sure you completed it or that woman is at a serious risk for hemmorhage and infection. At 20 weeks, a qualified doctor should be able to pick up on a pregnancy.

I think she should be compensated for the costs of the abortion and the trauma/psyc trauma of having a failed abortion and then not receiving prenatal care until late in her pregnancy. If she smoked/drank/etc, the baby could have serious problems. Also, she was not taking prenatal vitamins and did not have the benefit of important prenatal screens (like tests for gestational diabetes and pregnancy induced hypertension). She received sloppy, irresponsible care and should be compensated for this.

However, the end result was a healthy baby, which is not a negative ending. So, I do not feel that she should be conpensated for the life her child. That is inappropriate.

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Holly March 19, 2007 at 5:08 pm

Praise God that innocent blood was not shed again in our nation in this circumstance. How will this baby girl feel one day when she finds out the truth. I pray that God gives her a voice about the fact that “she” has a heart, “she” has a mind, and a body of her own. In response to those who argue “it’s my body”. It is not a woman’s body, it is another body given by our heavenly Father. God is in control, just like he was in this instance.

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Dee March 20, 2007 at 2:53 pm

Amen, Holly!

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Sandra March 26, 2007 at 1:28 pm

This little girl is alive for a reason and that reason will only bring more glory to God! She and her mother need prayer!

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lora December 26, 2007 at 1:27 am

She deserves to be compensated for the receving the outcome of the abortion as was the initial intention. The doctor is an abortion doctor and was paid to perform what he/she specializes in but yet failed to do. Can you imagine the shock and yes Im sure now 10 fold guilt that this woman has to bear everyuday for the rest of her life. She is doing the right thing by not giving her daughter up for abortion but instead now raising her as her way of asking God for forgiveness, and he does and will forgive. We don’t know what her circumstances were to begin with, so forgive her and also compensate her for the trauma she has had to endure!!! The doctors performed MALPRACTICE regardless..clear cut and dry, so pay up now at least this woman is trying to support the little girl now!!!

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Graduate of Harvard Law December 26, 2007 at 1:36 am

If I were one of the jurors in this trial I would TOTALLY without any question rule in favor of this woman. This is clearly malpractice, regardless of whether of the fact that she decided to keep her daughter instead of giving her up for adoption. The point in this case is what was supposed to happen initially and did NOT happen, that’s the point here and the fact that the doctor failed to perform this procedure correctly needs to be addressed immediatly because this is absolutely and CLEARLY malpractice!

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Mike December 26, 2007 at 11:15 am

The issue isn’t whether the law recognizes this type of action but whetehr it should. Abortion is the killing of another human being and should be illegal. But the Supremes misapplied the Constitution in 1973 so we are where we are.

You forgot one element of malpractice Harvard, damages. If what the woman really wants is the intended result of the procedure, then she would have given the baby up for adoption. She did not though. The fact that this woman is keeping the child shows that she actually wants the child and is therefore not damaged.

It looks like Harvard Law doesn’t teach every element of every tort anymore. Maybe that’s one reason why fewer people take Harvard seriously these days.

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Random T. April 22, 2009 at 3:03 am

This topic is quite hot on the Internet at the moment. What do you pay the most attention to while choosing what to write ?

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