Calling Iranian Terror by its Name

by Ryan on August 15, 2007

in The Iraq Front,War on Terror

I’ve been attending an educator’s workshop series this week on the Cold War and the War on Terror.  In fact, one of the speakers today was called by MSDNC this morning to comment later on a talking-head show about our classifying the Iranian Revolutionary Guard as a terror sponsoring group on the terror watch list.  The speaker said it was about 28 years late, but he’ll take it. 

This means that any companies who do business with the IRG cannot do legitimate business with American companies OR companies that trade with American companies.  Ouch.  I was not aware until today that the IRG gets its cash from domestic and international business ventures which it funnels to Hamas, Hezbollah, Syria and Mookie al Sadr’s band of mighty idiots.  The kick is that China is the IRG’s largest non-Iranian trading partner!  Also, the IRG is a separate entity from the conventional Iranian military and veterans like Mahmoud rise through the ranks of government through connections they made in IRG service.

This is not a declaration of war by any means, but it is a step to show Iran we’re serious about their disengagement in Iraq and the region.  If the IRG is on the terror watch list and we catch them in Iraq or elsewhere we can shoot first and ask questions later.  It’s important that Iran knows that.  The last thing they want is a war with us right now.  They just believe that a constant hum of destabilization in the region is in their best interest until they get their nuke and paint blue and white stripes next to the phrase “To Tel Aviv: With our love, infidels! -Mahmoud”. 

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

BillT August 16, 2007 at 9:14 am

You can find a complete list of the rammifications at the State Department’s website. This could be a precursor to military action.


Ryan August 16, 2007 at 3:09 pm

Maybe, but in the lecture series I’ve been attending this week I heard from one of the policy advisors to this administration who says military action is in no one’s best interest. Iran’s in a financial squeeze because funding Hezbollah, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, Mookie al Sadr, and parts of the Iraqi insurgency while at the same time maintaining their own military as you build a nuclear weapon is quite pricey. Hitting the IRG economically will have a real damaging effect to this regime, but (unfortunately) only if the UN and EU go along with it too. If everyone’s on board and serious we can force change, or force the 2/3 of Iran who are under 30 years old and despise the mullahs to take street justice into account.

One of the things this expert said was happening was that the IRG and police around Iran have been cracking down hard over the last 18 months. This is only fueling the flames of the youth movement– a movement that likes blue jeans, our music and not wearing those head dresses. But, if the US strikes Iran today, the Persian nationalist card would come up and galvanize support for the regime, not against it. More needs to develop. It seems like a reasonable point of view, but at what point does IRan use this knowledge to stonewall until they get their nuke. That’s a different calculation.


Matt August 18, 2007 at 11:15 am

If we go into Iran we will be up against the same guys we fought in Iraq. To find out what that was like you should pick up a book written by a U.S. soldier. It’s called “House To House”. I hear this is a fantastic book…..even better than Blackhawk Down. Spread the word! Support our

You can order it now:


This first-hand account of the 2004 Battle of Fallujah, Iraq, is written by
a former soldier who tells what it was like to fight in close combat,
against an enemy on its home territory. The American soldiers eventually won
the block-by-block battle, but the cost was great. David Bellavia conveys
the intense experiences of combat, and presents well-drawn portraits of his
fellow soldiers, as he captures their heroism and sacrifice in horrible


Leave a Comment

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Previous post:

Next post: