“Man’s Man’s Best Best Friend Friend” For Sale

by Ryan on February 16, 2008

in Anything Else,Culture

Cloning is a new and apprehensive science based on DNA manipulation using stem cells and hollowed embryos:  to many it lends to the old adage, “Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you must do it.”  However, that’s another debate for another time.

Recently, a Korean firm has found a way to put a positive spin on cloning: selling your cloned dog!  RNL Bio, a Korean science firm, is charging $150,000 if you just can’t live without Fido and would like a clone of him after he dies.  Cloning “man’s best friend” has an allure because our dogs become part of the family and only live 10-15 years on average. 

Snuppy” was first cloned in 2005.  His name stands for Seoul National University Puppy and is in the unique company of Dolly the Sheep, CC the Cat, and Ralph the Rat as the first successful clone of each respective animal.  Dogs are notoriously hard to clone apparently:  it took 1095 embryos and 123 dogs just to get one viable pup!  RNL Bio has improved the odds over the last few years and would like to sell you your old dog again.  To affluent pet owners, RNL Bio can bring you hope that a puppy that looks and acts a lot like your old dog can come home again.

I think that’s kind of spooky and quite expensive.  Dog breeds have very similar traits to one another in the same breed, conform to your method of training anyway in a similar manner, and if bought from the same breeder, it can save you around $148,000 without having a Franken-puppy who will probably not live as long as your original dog due to natural forces!  Just a thought.

FYI:  there are still many problems with cloning highly complex mammals.  Your new puppy, while a pup, has already gone through the same number of years as the host dog in cellular division… in this case making Snuppy’s cells 3 years and 60 days old on the day of his birth.  It’s an obstacle with an elusive solution that nature threw up there just to mess with us, hence the high rate of premature mortality among cloned animals.

AP photo.

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