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Axis of Right Radio, Show #8, August 11, 2010

August 11, 2010

Episode #8 of Axis of Right Radio is now available. In this episode, Mike, Ryan, and Sal discuss the role of the federal government; several states that are fighting back against ObamaCare; the economy’s loss of another 131,000 jobs; Pelosi and the Word; Massachusetts ditching the Electoral College; A federal judge ignoring Federalism and the [...]

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An Article V Convention

March 24, 2010

Article V of the United States Constitution discusses the concept of amending the Constitution.  Most people are familiar with the traditional way of amending the Constitution – 2/3 of each house of Congress proposes amendments, which then have to be ratified by the state legislatures or by conventions in 3/4 of the states.  But there [...]

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The Oregon Trail Leads to Michigan

January 27, 2010

Metaphorically, that is.  The voters of the State of Oregon yesterday passed ballot resolution that raised taxes on those making over $250,000 / year, and on businesses, including a higher minimum corporate tax and a surcharge on profits.  So let me get this straight.  Increase taxes on the people that buy things.  Increase taxes on [...]

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The Federalism Amendments

October 22, 2009

It is no secret that Congress has been overstepping its congressional authority for the better part of the last century.  The liberal philosophy has been such that Congress can essentially do anything according to the constitution.  Indeed, when asked recently what authority Congress had to mandate individuals to have health insurance, House Majority Leader Steny [...]

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The Unconstitutionality of ObamaCare

September 29, 2009

According to a recent New York Slimes Piece, several states across the nation are passing laws and resolutions outlawing the proposed government mandate requiring all citizens to have health insurance.  The Slimes piece, of course, takes a swipe at the efforts as mostly symbolic and posing little chance of success, but in reality, these laws [...]

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Proposing a Federailsm Amendment By Threatening a Constitutional Convention

April 23, 2009

Randy Barnett, a Constitutional Law Professor at Georgetown, had an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal that proposed a Federalism amendment to the Constitution, which would, among other things, repeal the 16th amendment (providing for the income tax) and require congress to preform only such functions that are enumerated in the Constitution.   Understanding that [...]

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Shredding the Constitution Under the Guise of Economic Stimulus

March 16, 2009

Several Governors, most notably Gov. Mark Sanford (R-SC) and Gov. Rick Perry (R-TX), have refused stimulus funds, due to the enormous amount of strings attached.  Yet due to a provision in the stimulus bill itself, legislatures have the power to override the Governor’s decision, and it appears that at least in South Carolina, that provision [...]

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A Return to Federalism?

February 19, 2009

There are many constants in life, politics, and history.  Two of those constants are the law of unintended consequences and the fact that radical shifts in political direction often produce backlashes.  This leads to the possibility that the Federal Government’s overreaching in the Stimulus package and other liberal legislation could lead to a return to [...]

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Supreme Court Smacks Bush, Mexicans, World Court

March 25, 2008

The Supreme Court voted 6-3 today to strike down President Bush’s adherence to a 1963 International Treaty where aliens caught committing a crime must be aware that they are entitled to legal counsel/advice when tried in American courts.  In today’s case, Medellin v. Texas (2008), the defendant argued that he was not made aware of this detail after his arrest (even though he [...]

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